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 More Laptop-friendly

Created 7 years ago, edited 7 years ago.
Status changed 5 years ago
Author:

Vincent
Status:
Considered
  Score:
 263
310 votes
Idea:

Please make Mint a more laptop-friendly distribution. You'd think that since Mint uses less resources than Windows Vista/7, it'd also be more energy-efficient, but I guess my assumption was wrong. Most of the time it breaks even with Windows when it comes to battery life, at least on my laptop, although sometimes it falls behind a bit, by about a half-hour of battery life.

I'd like to see more than just Gnome Power Manager in the Control Panel. I'd love to have CPU frequency scaling enabled by default and more accessible, and more commands/utilities that allow you to tweak things so that your laptop doesn't consume as much power. Packages like "powertop" (which can be found in Synaptic) can really help to get the most out of your battery. ;)

Comments:

1 month ago

absolute
I think there should be an edition which is targeted for the notebooks. This special edition will be less bulky and more optimized.  
2 years ago

belmethos
I am using CPU Frequency Applet it is perfect.

Looks like this;
http://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/1113424/img/indicator-cpufreq.png
 
2 years ago

asderceder
I'm also in favor for laptop meta packages. Another idea would be to release laptop editions of Linux Mint, with Xfce (or LXDE, or both) as preinstalled DE.  
2 years ago

SparcUltimo
Hi guys. I installed Mint 17 Xfce on my Netbook Toschiba 510. I did just use 25 % RAM for Idle Process. Too much. Well, I installed Openbox with fbpanel. Awesome. Just 15 % Ram for Idle Process. I would like to have an openbox realise, or whatever, just for netbooks.  
2 years ago

SparcUltimo
Hi guys. I installed Mint 17 Xfce on my Netbook Toschiba 510. I did just use 25 % RAM for Idle Process. Too much. Well, I installed Openbox with fbpanel. Awesome. Just 15 % Ram for Idle Process. I would like to have an openbox realise, or whatever, just for netbooks.  
2 years ago

SparcUltimo
Hi guys. I installed Mint 17 Xfce on my Netbook Toschiba 510. I did just use 25 % RAM for Idle Process. Too much. Well, I installed Openbox with fbpanel. Awesome. Just 15 % Ram for Idle Process. I would like to have an openbox realise, or whatever, just for netbooks.  
2 years ago

SparcUltimo
Hi guys. I installed Mint 17 Xfce on my Netbook Toschiba 510. I did just use 25 % RAM for Idle Process. Too much. Well, I installed Openbox with fbpanel. Awesome. Just 15 % Ram for Idle Process. I would like to have an openbox realise, or whatever, just for netbooks.  
2 years ago

flash16
Yes, mint makes the battery not last very long, and I just got a new battery, too  
2 years ago

flash16
Yes, the battery doesn't last very long, and I just got a new battery, too  
3 years ago

belmethos
TLP is good but requires a GUI  
3 years ago

andreas-h
Also, it could be a good idea to have a "meta-package" for laptops, including a community selection of all these things. That would make it easier for newbies without technical experience and interest to get started.  
3 years ago

andreas-h
"System Settings" could have an app for

a) adjusting CPU frequency scaling, depending on battery or A/C

b) (after installing tlp) have a GUI for configuring TLP (http://linrunner.de/en/tlp/tlp.html). Installation of TLP should be strongly encouraged on laptios
 
3 years ago

molmole
Mint 17 became more mature than the older versions, especially about battery life. But, windows still ahead with 40% at least longer battery life.  
3 years ago

HerrDierk
Mint 17 works well on my laptop. No problems at all.  
3 years ago

GILINUX
XFCE works well on my Laptop  
5 years ago

quake0
Just replace XFCE with LXDE.  
5 years ago

RayWoods
The have been issues with some laptops and code in the kernel lately, which is rather outside the remit of our Development Team. As @blueXrider said, if you have an issue with your computer and Linux Mint, go to the forums for help.

Rejected.
 
5 years ago

lemieszek
One idea I could put up as a new one, but I think is related to this one is this: ironhide or bumblebee installed by default. Not sure how that would work and how stress-free the configuration would be, but with hybrid graphic cards becoming more and more popular. a lot of laptops out there become just too power-hungry with the default LinuxMint installation (since the dedicated card is usually automatically enabled and has to be disabled by ironhide or bumblebee).

What I'm saying might be a bunch of crap since I'm a total newb, but... there's my 2 cents.
 
6 years ago

ctsdownloads
The good news is that you don't have to wait. On both my main laptop and on my 1005HA Eee netbook, I rock this little applet.
http://www.jupiterapplet.org/index.html

It works VERY well and is just what is needed. Works great on Mint 12, both desktop environments. This will do exactly what you want. ;)
 
6 years ago

carlosjimy
You know, the distro should be the most general and usefull posible... anyway there are several tool to control power consumption in detail that have no sense for desktop for example. I'm not sure if this tools should be included by default.  
6 years ago

vikoadi
Laptop-mode tool by default everybody?  
6 years ago

blueXrider
If you have some specific issues you might want to hit the forums. My Toshiba doesn't have any issues.  
6 years ago

bugz
Probably my personal misconfiguration issue, but my laptop (Vaio SZ6RVN) can't suspend when closing it. I'd like this expected behaviour to be enabled by default.  
6 years ago

thebeav
I am a ThinkPad guy and my X60 works flawlessly, including all the Fn keys. Battery life is as good if not better than XP Pro. Very stable.  
6 years ago

kip-
its simple.. you can do it by your self :) linux is freedom so grab all you need from repos or net and customize it..  
6 years ago

scame
I agree. Low energy-efficient is a problem in my laptop.  
6 years ago

chi_julia
I believe I've heard that short battery life is a known kernel issue -- apparently some of the more recent kernel upgrades have spawned this problem across the linux community, not just in mint, ubuntu, or debian.  
6 years ago

vnzjunk
I just loaded Mint 11 32bit DVD onto my Toshiba Satellite A-250S5837 series laptop. Seems to work fine. One problem I have is when trying to use the S-Video output port to send video to my TV. I get the video except that it is not in color. Black and White.

Does anyone know of a Fix? Or possibly a better place to post my question?

Other than that I think that I am going to be happy with Mint 11.

Thanks in advance.
vnzjunk@gmail.com
 
6 years ago

Twiguard
If you run out of battery too fast try the LXDE edition. In my case the difference was about an hour (from 2 to 3). ;-)  
6 years ago

ThatCoolGuy220
@Tatsujin

I agree with you
 
6 years ago

tatsujin79
I support this idea due to the fact that all distros need to be more friendly with more hardware as a whole. Although as far as Mint v Windows vista/7 is concerned windows 7 takes up 98% cpu and around 670MB of my 1GB ram at all times, the battery dies in about 4 min on my laptop. Mint 10 takes about 17% cpu about 320Mb ram and battery lasts about an hr. Perhaps this is an issue with your individual hardware and not mint?  
6 years ago

OneDragon
I am totally pro this idea since I experience exactly the same problem, just a bit worse, with me breaking even isn't even close.  
6 years ago

stu2731652
And I'd like a nice UI for my netbook!(like Unity for Ubuntu Netbook)  
6 years ago

tcc559
most of the time when i use a boot cd/dvd or just install mint on my laptop its generally plugged in anyway from past experiences with my battery draining to fast.

even if a few features can be implemented to just increase battery life by even a small amount would make a difference.

im using a toshiba sattelite a300, its now im guessing ive had it for 3 years or so now.

under windows it will last 1 hour on battery (its worn out in 3 years by 50% but in mint it lasts around 25mins, i understand its not designed for a laptop (thats what this discussion is about with a laptop verison)

but once small changes are made with the way the OS handles battery power im sure it will make a huge difference overall.

is it as easy as adding a dedicated battery scheme? that could have 2 points *laptop* and *desktop*

 
6 years ago

carsten
What I forgot yesterday: Under WinXp I played a lot with RM Clock to undervolt the processor. And I achieved a significant decrease in fan speed under full load (and off course a longer battery life). I have read, that under linux I have to adapt the kernel (phc), but I did not dare to do this yet (I am still far away from a linux guru). But it would be nice if a laptop adapted version of Linux Mint would include this.  
6 years ago

carsten
I use LMDE 64bit considering the hints of the program powertop and run the harddrive with the noatime option. I get about 7 to 8 hours of battery life. With Ubuntu and no effort of power saving I managed to get 4 hours In Win 7 I can only get about 5 to 6 hours.
Including some of this option in the installation dialog for laptops would be a nice feature! But I am already now really happy wuth LMDE in therms of power saving.
 
6 years ago

jordan4girl3
good idea...i was thinking of installing it on my old laptop...so that would be nice lol :]  
6 years ago

akash211
I am currently using mint10 and windows7 but in both i am getting about the same battery life of 1hr. I always use windows7 and linuxmint in powersave mode. So I don't get a problem. Linuxmint uses less resources and I am happy with its battery life in mint.  
6 years ago

RobinJ
I'm currently using it on my laptop and I'm perfectly happy with it. And it does use less resources than Windows 7, I've also got Windows 7 installed on my laptop and it uses 5 times as much of my system resources. The power management in Mint is a bit poor. On Windows 7 I can work with my laptop for 3 hours while on battery power (power saving mode), and in Mint that's only only one and a half hour (and I put the processor on power save mode by using the applet for the Gnome Panel).  
6 years ago

keyneom
+1 but don't think it should be taken as a priority (tons of other things to do already) and don't think it will be taken as a priority, maybe in the future  
6 years ago

canci
For the HD, you can at least turn off writing timestamps by mounting the partitions as "noatime". That IMO should be default in every desktop distro. Also, there are things like decreasing swapping in favour of more RAM usage (which of course is only useful if you have more than 2 GB RAM). This decreases battery usage as well. Mind you, these things get you only a little bit more time. Nothing earth shattering.

http://forums.debian.net/viewtopic.php?t=31275

I agree though that Mint could do a better job in scanning what system is run and disabling atime, decreasing swap use, etc. if it is applicable, or or apply many of the laptop-mode-tools.
 
7 years ago

eerika_
good idea  
7 years ago

omns
It sounds like a simple install of powertop solves your problems. I don't see why it should be installed by default. The default power manger is more than adequate for most users.  
7 years ago

ganeshhappy143
linux mint provides better power management info.
It has good power management tool.
 
7 years ago

ganeshhappy143
good idea  
7 years ago

Twiguard
Maybe the voltage could scale too.  
7 years ago

luisnando
One suggestion, it would be great to have a GUI for laptop-mode-tools. So each user can configure the power consuption for its needs...  
7 years ago

kneekoo
I'm also using Linux Mint on a laptop so I need better power management tools as well. I hope the Mint developers can do something about this.  
7 years ago

oco13
Jupiter maybe a good start.  
7 years ago

tux-flo
A first step can be the Integration of Jupiter...  
7 years ago

13thSlayer
Good idea.  
7 years ago

bradtricker
I agree, a automatic power saver mode would be great. That way, you don't have to scale down the CPU every time.  
7 years ago

Abd3l
I have a netbook with Linux Mint installed on it, its pretty fast, and wayyyy faster than 7 or vista,i have a 6-cell battey and from how little power it takes i have around 10 hours of battery life.  
7 years ago

justin
Battery life in Linux is generally worse than Windows across all distributions - there is not anything Mint, Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, SuSE, Gentoo, etc. does in specific to get this result. The issue lies in the ext3/4 filesystems which are always writing data to the hard drive. This is mostly the journaling/indexing which are always being written. Ext4 has been a marked improvement over ext3 in this regard, and it is of course hopeful that btrfs (one of the next filesystems) will be addressing this issue more. This is the main reason why the battery life is worse than Windows - the disk is always spinning. This is by design.

Sorry to disappoint, but the best way to get more battery life is to do the same as you do in Windows - run less programs and services, turn down the screen brightness, underclock your processor when it is not being used heavily. No magic here. :)

Fwiw, cpufrequtils should automatically be installed and be utilized if your processor supports dynamic scaling.
 
7 years ago

Xyie
Some extra tools, either provided or suggested, for laptops would be good, but I don't think it's a good idea to wrap these in the default install. Either a suggestion after install (like the hardware detection tool, popping up notifying that "hey, you've got [a laptop], and there's extra packages for that sort of thing.") or even just a bundled package of laptop tools in the repositories (a featured package, perhaps, for easy finding?) would be good. No need to bog down desktop users with the extra tools, though.

I personally think the "suggestion" route would be best.
 
7 years ago

ichat
i didn't promote this, because its rather hard to implement and its not verry usefull,


in this case it would be more usefull if there would be a laptop package in the repositories, 1 package that depends on all the laptop packages you may want, and configure you system to laptop settings...

is about the same but less intrusive for non laptop users (mind you i am a laptop user too ) so im not biased
 
7 years ago

mikefreeman
Is there a way for Mint to detect whether or not it is being used on a laptop? If so, it might be good to either auto-download and install laptop tools during the installation process, or at least have a pop-up the first time you boot in, saying something to this effect: "Linux Mint has detected that you are using a laptop or portable device. Click Ok to install laptop-specific tools. [Ok] [Cancel]" This would be similar to how the system pops up letting you know that there are proprietary hardware drivers available.  
7 years ago

AgingTechnogeek
I have 2 laptops and a netbook. Anything that increases battery operation time gets a yes vote from me.  
7 years ago

aehjr1
I agree completely! My main Mint machine is my laptop. One thing I really miss about Gloria is the ability to disable the touchpad completely via Control Panel. Getting rid of that was a mistake, IMHO; what would have been better is the single thing I miss from Windoze--the ability to disable the touchpad as soon as a USB mouse is detected and enable the touchpad when USB mouse is removed. Sure, I know the tricks, but with distros standardizing on getting rid of xorg.conf in favor of auto-sensing the environment, it makes sense to have a solution which doesn't require add the config file which then can hose other configurations.  
7 years ago

asymmetros
A few integrated tools is the best idea, i think  
7 years ago

Frank
I totally agree!
I use Mint in my laptop too
 
7 years ago

RayWoods
There is an ever increasing number of those using Mint on their laptops so maybe we should consider either a specific mobile edition or the integrated tools to make Mint laptop friendly.  

Other ideas from Vincent