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Written by:
clem
Score: 82
votes: 84
Format: Article

 How to install Linux Mint via USB


Scope of this tutorial

This tutorial only covers Hybrid ISO images.

Starting with the release of Linux Mint 12 KDE RC, Linux Mint switched to Hybrid ISO images.

Previous releases such as Linux Mint 9, 10, 11, or even the main edition of Linux Mint 12 are not covered by this tutorial.

What is a Hybrid image?

Traditionally, tools such as 'Startup Disk Creator' or 'UNetbootin' were needed to install Linux Mint via USB.

With hybrid images, you can simply write the content of the ISO and make a bootable USB stick which can install Linux Mint by using the 'dd' command.

Pros:

  • The resulting USB stick will act exactly like a liveCD/DVD.
  • The process is fast and simple
  • Hybrid ISOs are still compatible with Unetbootin and Startup Disk Creator

Cons:

  • This method deletes all the data present on the USB drive
  • The USB stick isn't persistent (though you can still use Unetbootin to do this).

How to make the USB stick?

Using mintStick

mintStick is installed by default in Linux Mint.

Launch "USB Image Writer" from the menu, select your ISO image and your USB device and press "Write to device".

Using the Terminal

It is really simple. Go to a Terminal and type:
 

sudo dd if=~/Desktop/linuxmint.iso of=/dev/sdx oflag=direct  bs=1048576

Where '~/Desktop/linuxmint.iso' is the name and location of your downloaded image (located at the desktop in this example) and '/dev/sdx' is the target USB drive. If your system doesn't support 'oflag=direct', you can just leave it out as it is simply intended to speed up the process a bit.

If you don't know about the target USB drive path, run this command and figure out your destination drive.

sudo fdisk -l

Warning: Make sure to set the correct device path, as this process will delete all data that was on the specified device previously!

Remember, don't include an integer for the USB drive, e.g. '/dev/sdx1', as it would refer to the existing partition on that drive and not the drive itself.

When the USB has been properly created by 'dd', there should be an output similar to this:

sudo dd if=~/Desktop/linuxmint.iso of=/dev/sdb oflag=direct bs=1048576
706+1 records in
706+1 records out
740601856 bytes (741 MB) copied, 91.7024 s, 8.1 MB/s

Using Microsoft Windows

From Windows, you can use 'Pendrive Linux Universal USB Installer':

http://www.pendrivelinux.com/universal-usb-installer-easy-as-1-2-3/

Alternatively, you can use 'Image Writer', an open source project from Launchpad.

https://launchpad.net/win32-image-writer/+download

Note: You might need to rename the ISO file and change its extension from .iso to .img for it to be accepted by Image Writer. To do this in Windows you can disable the setting 'Hide extensions for known file types' under 'Folder Options'.


Source: This tutorial was inspired by http://www.tuxgarage.com/2011/06/ubuntu-switched-to-hybrid-disc-images.html


Tags: usb stick linux mint install burn iso img
Created: 2 years ago.
Last edited: 1 year ago.
Reviewed: 2 years ago.
Read 0 times.

Comments
3 months ago

mhenriday
An excellent tutorial ! My own experience with mintStick, however, has not been good - I've tried several times to use it to install a Linux Mint (both 16 and 17) ISO which I had downloaded to a HDD (and checked the md5 sum) on usb THUMBDRIVE, but every time I've attempted to use it to install Mint, I've received a notice to the effect that the file was defective. Fortunately, using the command line procedure workED splendidly for me ; for example, the USB stick thus produced installed LM17 om my main box in a matter of minutes....

Alas, I neglected to copy the failure notice I received when attempting to install from the USB drive produced via mintStick, so there's probably little hope of determining what exactly went wrong. But it would be interesting to hear if anyone else has encountered similar problems....

In any event,many thanks to Clem for this tutorial and kudos to him and the other developers for Linux Mint 17 ; it's a beauty !...

Henri
 
4 months ago

Kaller
Ok, I messed up and I know exactly what I did, but I don't know how to fix it.
I have a laptop with 2 drives, sda 80gb with Ubuntu 14.10 on as my main OS.
Then on a second drive sdb ntfs 320gb with stuff on it I want...I put:
Sudo dd if=/xxx/linux-mint-16-cinnimon-32-bit.iso of=/dev/sdb1 bs=4M; sync

Obviously, I put the drive integer, cuz I didn't think it through...what would I do to fix that?
Btw, was obviously shoe horning mint in as a second OS with no Usb drives loaded right and a broken CD drive, lol
 
5 months ago

april90
can this step works with, Linux Mint 16 "Petra" - Cinnamon (32-bit)?
4gb flashdrive is enough?
 
1 year ago

cwjoyce
The explanation of 'hybrid' images is key! I also was unable to make on USB with the windows programs. I suggest that windows anti-virus programs may prevent the creation of an 'autorun' file, but that is not conclusive. I was able to create a DVD, then use it to create the USB version using the 'mintStick" method described above. (New like me? Go to the menu and choose 'all programs'. They are alphabetical in English.) Hope this helps!  
1 year ago

mcadut
Cant make bootable olivia xfce with unetbootin, universal usb bootable, lili useb creator, win32 image creator.  
1 year ago

Rutrus
Si usas Ubuntu puedes usar el "Creador de discos de arranque" que equivale al comando usb-creator-gtk

Es muy versátil para instalar distros basadas en Ubuntu, y permite un espacio persistente.
 
1 year ago

mtmtnhigh
Thank you for suggesting the dd option. It worked perfectly. I made a start-up USB using Start Up Disk Creator in Ubuntu and UnetBootin, but both would not boot with my Dell Mini 9. I've used dd before when installing new ssd's. It's great not having to start from scratch and re-download and reconfigure everything with a new drive. Didn't think dd command was applicable with an ISO file, but obviously it is. Thanks again.  
1 year ago

dpa2007
the above procedure is only for creating a bootable usb stick in order to install Linux Mint?is it possible to fully install Linux Mint on a usb stick in replace of of a bootable cd/dvd?  
1 year ago

alaskan
Where can i get linux mint 14 to load to a flash drive?  
1 year ago

S0ul
screenshot of linux mint 14 cinnamon running on MacBook Air Gen 2

http://img27.imageshack.us/img27/6103/screenshotlinuxmint14v1.jpg
 
1 year ago

S0ul
I successfully installed linux mint 14 cinnamon on my macbook air gen 2 via a bootable usb stick, here's how to create the boot stick inside mac osx:

http://www.ubuntu.com/download/help/create-a-usb-stick-on-mac-osx

:)
 
1 year ago

cryptic
works well but I'm running Ubuntu 10.04 and i have to run imagewriter as root:
"cryptic@whitehouse.gov:~$ sudo imagewriter"
 
1 year ago

Hexeta
I'm running Windows Vista and want to create a bootable Live USB of mint 13 for which I've downloaded the ISO file.
I've downloaded "Image Writer" from the link here, but I'm finding it impossible to "Simply run the uitlity" as the readme note says.
Can anyone explain how to use this please?
 
1 year ago

rjlohman
Thanks. Can't wait to try this to get mint on the netbook.

@Tuber: to be precise, KB, MB, GB, etc. refer to the metric system (base 10) so 1 MB is 1,000,000 bytes. If you wish to represent a number in an abbreviated base 2, use MiB, GiB, TiB, etc.

The convention of using a single char to represent a unit of measure as you correctly demonstrated in the dd command is a convention specific to the developer, not at all tied to the base if the numbering system.

Prost!
Rich
 
1 year ago

pmorcombe
I have been using that Pendrive Linux tutorial but it drives me crazy because of the lack of "persistence". You appear to have taken care of that problem!  
1 year ago

duervo
Here are the steps for Mac OS X (similar to the steps using Terminal):

1. First, I used diskutil to reset the USB key to a single partition.

2. Next, I ran the following commands from a terminal window:

# Become root
$ sudo su
Password:

# Lst current drives, to get device name for USB key (in this example, the USB key is /dev/disk1)
sh-3.2# diskutil list
/dev/disk0
#: TYPE NAME SIZE IDENTIFIER
0: GUID_partition_scheme *100.0 GB disk0
1: EFI 209.7 MB disk0s1
2: Apple_HFS Macintosh HD 99.7 GB disk0s2
/dev/disk1
#: TYPE NAME SIZE IDENTIFIER
0: FDisk_partition_scheme *4.0 GB disk1
1: DOS_FAT_32 UNTITLED 1 4.0 GB disk1s1

# If the USB key has a partition from it that is currently mounted, then unmount it.
sh-3.2# diskutil unmount /dev/disk1s1
Volume UNTITLED 1 on disk1s1 unmounted

sh-3.2# ls
linuxmint-13-xfce-dvd-32bit.iso
linuxmint-13-xfce-dvd-64bit.iso

# Write the Linux Mint ISO image to the USB key.
sh-3.2# dd if=./linuxmint-13-xfce-dvd-64bit.iso of=/dev/disk1 bs=1048576
795+0 records in
795+0 records out
833617920 bytes transferred in 490.581580 secs (1699244 bytes/sec)

 
2 years ago

Chesterboy
As an update Please note I was referring to the Binary zip version of Image writer 0.6 and running it under Windows xp..... Just download it and unzip then run Select the Linux Mint ISO making sure to rename it to an IMG file. Then select where your USB Drive is and off you go...  
2 years ago

Chesterboy
This worked perfect for me using an USB on an old Compaq4000 wunning win xp Do note I used win Image Writer........ But please note when you go to download do use the binary.zip version 0.6 and make the change from ISO to Img... note the edit.in the file name. Also note I'm using Linux Mint 13 iso  
2 years ago

Tuber
bs=1048576?

Isn't bs=1M easier to type? 1024x1024=1048576 bytes, or 1 Megabyte, which can be abbreviated in dd by 1M.

c =1
w =2
b =512
kB=1000
K =1024
MB=1000*1000
M =1024*1024
GB=1000*1000*1000
G =1024*1024*1024
and so on for T, P, E, Z, Y.
 
2 years ago

breaker
For the command below, label -I, that is dash capital i, not l or 1...

See man mkfs.vfat for the manual page and switch details...
 
2 years ago

breaker
Good one. For those who need to reformat their drive when done...

For FAT32 from Linux; sudo mkfs.vfat -n label -I /dev/sdx
(label is what label you want to use)

For those in Windows, a fine program to reformat to FAT32 is RMPrepUSB, you can use the "clean" option first if it gives you issues; http://www.rmprepusb.com/ It is an advanced removable drive prep tool, but also good for formatting.
 
2 years ago

reesemitchell
this is to mugabuga What it did was creat a partion on your usb key what you need to do is delete the partion and refoment your usb key you can do this by useing gparted if you do not have it install go to the termail and type sudo apt-get install gparted

once it is install just find your usb drive:"WARING" DO NOT DELETE OR FORMAT THE WRONG DRIVE" BECAREFUL.

once you do that it should fix your problem i hope this helps.

if you want your usb compatible with windows use ntfs if you just want it compatible with linux use something like ext

i hope this helps.

reese mitchell.
 
2 years ago

mugabuga
I used imageWriter and now I can't seem to figure out how to re-format my USB back to 8GB. It's current capacity is reading 1.1GBs. Any way to reformat it to it's correct size?  
2 years ago

blu35p4rr0w
Do not listen to the guy below me. Win32-Disk-Imager is less confusing and requires less clicks to use than LinuxLiveUSB. It also doesn't require watching a video to use. Just change the .iso to .img like it says in the tutorial above. Select the USB drive you want to use and the .iso you just renamed to .img and click write. There is no "What the heck is persistent mode? What are the checkboxes in Options for?" Win32DI is just click, click, click, done.

If you use Win32-Disk-Imager it will change the USB drives capacity to that of the .iso you wrote to it. Windows will not recognize it's full capacity in order to format it properly. If you want to fix this in windows you can use a program called "Bootice"

How to:
Download Bootice 0.9 from the address below.
http://www.softpedia.com/progDownload/Bootice-Download-180137.html
Extract bootice_0.9.rar
Run BOOTICE.EXE
Select the USB you want to restore under "Destination Disk"
Click on "Parts Manage"
Click on "ReFormat USB disk"
Leave "USB-FDD mode" checked and click on "Next"
Select "FAT32" and give it a label if you wish then click "OK"
Click "Yes" to confirm and voila
Now your USB has a new MBR and its full capacity is restored!

The Tutorial above covers everything you need to do in order to get a fully working bootable LiveUSB for LinuxMint12. Don't waste your time with LinuxLiveUSB if you're doing this in windows. I will note that whilst the terminal command did create a LiveUSB, my bios would not boot it since the USB wasn't FAT32. Also, I could not figure out how to use ImageWriter or StartupDiskCreator in Lighthouse64 which is not based on Debian at all. I'm a noob when it comes to compiling source code, nor am I familiar with the terminal commands Lighthouse64 uses. So Win32-Disk-Imager on my Win7 laptop was my best choice.
 
2 years ago

kittyspit
For a nube, all these options were non-intuitive and missing instruction. However, I found a really great install program called "linux live usb creator." Here's the youtube video and the link for download is there. Totally foolproof.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yYMLSpBdRec
 
2 years ago

matheos
Cool !! very nice this tutorial but how to go back to normal partiton now ?

we must delete partition table, rewrite it and format it in fat32.
 
2 years ago

yurayko
@danpe91 
'oflag=direct' explained above: "you can just leave it out as it is simply intended to speed up the process a bit" ie avoiding the buffer cache, and 'bs=1048576' equal to the 'bs=1k' it means block(s) is/are 1MB
 
2 years ago

Polo
I'm very new to this, but I used "Startup Disk Creator" (installed with Linux Mint 12) to transfer the .iso of Mint LXDE to a USB flash drive, as I wasn't getting much joy with the method described above.

The drive appears to be persistent (although I may well be failing to understand what persistence is, of course) - in fact part of the process, the GUI states that it's creating persistence files (or something similar, this is from memory).

LXDE runs perfectly - with the small exception of my eee PC 901 needing the Esc key pressing on startup to force it to select the USB to boot from. This may also be the reason why the method on this page didn't work...
 
2 years ago

clem
Thanks, typo fixed.  
2 years ago

danpe91
What is this for?

" oflag=direct bs=1048576 "
 
2 years ago

Rua42
I think there is a small mistake? In the first command line in the tutorial, 'bs=' is missing?  
2 years ago

mattzyzy
Just my two cents, for other Mint flavours-Main/Gnome v12 v11 v7-v10 (of course dozens of other Linux distros -even FreeDOS,Parted Magic , etc) standard ISO image file (.iso) ,not hybrid which is not covered by above tutorial, you can always use free open source UNetbootin .

UNetbootin -easy to use ,small file-intuitive user interface,(Windows,Linux and Mac OS X) and simplistic online documentation (one-page user guide+FAQs) .GNU GPL v.2

Just make sure the USB stick/pendrive/thumbdrive is formatted with FAT32 filesystem and enough space allocated.

UNetbootin can also help you download the ISO (If you haven't downloaded it yet) . It even allows for internal hard drive setup( a bit complex though for hd that already have operating system installed).

Hope this helps.
link:
http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/

**Oh , fyi,this comment is written on Linux Mint 12 32-bit Gnome Lisa(live) on my 2-year old 4gb usb2.0 stick created using UNetbootin
 
2 years ago

eklem
Just to help those along that have the same question as I: Where to find the hybrid image? Go to "Download > All versions" and click on "12" or "Lisa". At the bottom you find the KDE RC-versions (32 and 64 bits).

Or simply go to this link =)
http://www.linuxmint.com/release.php?id=17

And a small error possibly (not sure, since it's Mint-syntax):
apt install usb-imagewriter
should be:
sudo apt-get install usb-imagewriter

?
 

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