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2021-08-26 18:08:25

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Software reviews
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com.giuspen.cherrytree
"CherryTree is above & beyond awesome! I wanted to start using an outline processor instead of a text editor to keep my notes, but CherryTree has greatly exceeded my expectations. Its capabilities go far beyond a simple outline processor allowing you to insert links in the node content that you are creating that link to another (internal) node in the CherryTree document that you are creating (so you are not limited to a strictly hierarchical structure: you can create an arbitrary network structure of your nodes), or you can link to a file or a folder on your system or to a website. It has node backwards and forwards navigation arrows that let you go to the last visited node in your document hierarchy (or network). It supports all kinds of formatting: font, color, style, etc. You can embed images, tables and code boxes (with syntax highlighting!) It can import at least 14 other file formats from other text/outline processors, as well as plain old text files and HTML files. It can export to PDF, HTML, textfile or to a new CherryTree document. Many more features, but it's also intuitive to use, so you can figure out most capabilities."
5
cherrytree
"CherryTree is above & beyond awesome! I wanted to start using an outline processor instead of a text editor to keep my notes, but CherryTree has greatly exceeded my expectations. Its capabilities go far beyond a simple outline processor allowing you to insert links in the node content that you are creating that link to another (internal) node in the CherryTree document that you are creating (so you are not limited to a strictly hierarchical structure: you can create an arbitrary network structure of your nodes), or you can link to a file or a folder on your system or to a website. It has node backwards and forwards navigation arrows that let you go to the last visited node in your document hierarchy (or network). It supports all kinds of formatting: font, color, style, etc. You can embed images, tables and code boxes (with syntax highlighting!) It can import at least 14 other file formats from other text/outline processors, as well as plain old text files and HTML files. It can export to PDF, HTML, textfile or to a new CherryTree document. Many more features, but it's also intuitive to use, so you can figure out most capabilities."
5
com.leinardi.gwe
"Works great for fan control, I can't say about overclocking because I don't overclock. I had to perform two updates to get it to work: using the Driver Manager app (Main Menu > Administration > Driver Manager) I updated my GPU driver to "nvidia-driver-470 Version 470.57.02-0ubuntu0.20.04.1" which was labeled "(recommended)", and I had to run "flatpak update" in a terminal, as suggested by the GWE app. I rebooted after each change. Linux Mint 20.2, Cinnamon 5.0.5, i5-7600 CPU, 16 GB RAM, MSI H270M Mortar Artic motherboard, Nvidia GTX 1060 6GB GPU. Three monitors, two using the motherboard's builtin graphics and a third connected to the GPU. The GWE app says that "Launch on login" is not supported by Flatpak, but the latest comment on the referenced github page for this issue says that they tried it, and it worked, so using Main menu > Preferences > Startup Applications, I clicked on the + button to add the following Custom Command "/usr/bin/flatpak run --branch=stable --arch=x86_64 --command=/app/bin/gwe --file-forwarding com.leinardi.gwe @@u %U @@" and I added a 2 second delay, just to be safe that everything else had completed initializations, probably not necessary but doesn't hurt. Then using GWE I created my own Fan profile to keep my GPU cooler, like in the 40s C for normal use. Before this, my GPU would get up into the 60s C, when not doing anything especially intensive. My profile parameters for (Temperature,Duty) are: (20,20), (36,30), (45,47), (60,78),(68,90),(75,100). I just tried some different settings to get the fan control curve to keep my GPU temp in the 40s for normal use. I will be using my GPU for some machine learning, and I know I will have to accept higher temps for that, I may take my third monitor off the GPU so it only runs the machine learning stuff. So yeah, I'm very happy with this app!"
5
zynaddsubfx
"This appears to be a very powerful soft synth, supporting different synthesis techniques: subtractive, additive and a type of wavetable synthesis. It comes with a lot of presets and the ability to define waveforms, display harmonic content and also add effects like reverb. It works out-of-the-box with its included virtual keyboard, but when I connected my external MIDI keyboard using a Roland UM-ONE MIDI-to-USB interface, I got nothing! I figured out that on Linux Mint 19.3 I needed to use the aconnect command. So, start up ZynAddSubFX -- it should have been added to your main menu (in the Sound & Video submenu) when you installed it, with ALSA, JACK & OSS audio system variants -- I used ALSA. Then using its USB port or a MIDI-to-USB interface connect your MIDI keyboard (or other MIDI controller) to a USB port on your computer. The soft synth app needs to be started and your MIDI device needs to be connected for them both to show up in the output of the "aconnect -l" command. Then, type that command, "aconnect -l" to see if and how your computer is sensing these connections. I got the following 10 lines of output (I'll use ### as a line separator, since this website eats newlines): ### client 0: 'System' [type=kernel] ### 0 'Timer ' ### 1 'Announce ' ### client 14: 'Midi Through' [type=kernel] ### 0 'Midi Through Port-0' ### client 20: 'UM-ONE' [type=kernel,card=1] ### 0 'UM-ONE MIDI 1 ' ### Connecting To: 128:0 ### client 128: 'ZynAddSubFX' [type=user,pid=10525] ### 0 'ZynAddSubFX ' ### (Some of your data will probably differ. The important datum is the name of your MIDI keyboard or MIDI interface that you're using to connect your MIDI keyboard to your computer, in my case "UM-ONE", and, "ZynAddSubFX", the name of the soft synth.) Finally, I used the following command to connect things: aconnect UM-ONE ZynAddSubFX (Your connection command with be the same, except instead of UM-ONE, you will have the name of your MIDI keyboard, if it has a USB output, or the name of your MIDI-to-USB interface, which for me, was UM-ONE). Also, take a look at Yoshimi, which is a soft synth that is derived from ZynAddSubFX, so it is similar, but has some differences."
5
yoshimi
"This soft synth is derived from ZynAddSubFX, and is similar, but has some differences. They're both very powerful. See my review of ZynAddSubFX to learn how I got both of them to work with my external MIDI keyboard using the aconnect command."
5
refind
"rEFInd is indispensible to set up your Mac to dual boot Linux Mint and MacOS and probably also awesome to select from multiple EFI boot loaders on your Linux box. I wanted to install Linux Mint on an old Macmini (mid-2010) so that if my Linux box failed for some reason and I couldn't get it running, I would have another computer running Linux Mint that I know and love that I could use until I could get my Linux box up and running again. While the Mac provides bootcamp to set up your Mac to dual boot Windows and MacOS, it provides no support to set it up to dual boot Linux and MacOS. To do this, the rEFInd boot manager (which selects a boot loader for each OS) is wonderful. The website for rEFInd has a lot of information and I found that rEFInd was meticulously written and covers the many versions of MacOS. You will probably need to disable MacOS SIP to successfully run rEFInd, and then re-enable it on the Mac. The zip archive that you download from the rEFInd website to your Mac also contains a very useful utility: refind-mkdefault which makes rEFInd the default boot manager and is a lot easier to use than efibootmgr."
5